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September 2020

CQC2T Online Seminar: Speakers Ruvi Lecamwasam and Hao Jeng – ANU

September 29 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

In this seminar we will hear from two of our PhD students - Ruvi Lecamwasam and Hao Jeng - from ANU presenting their latest research. Research Overview: How your choice of measurement basis bounds estimator error - answers using entropy and circular statistics Speaker: Ruvi Lecamwasam, ANU Research overview: Teleporting coherent states of photons with reduced decoherence Speaker: Hao Jeng, ANU Abstract: Quantum teleportation of a coherent state causes it to evolve from a superposition of Fock states into a statistical…

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QSI UTS Online Seminar: Building Multiple Access Channels with a Single Particle – Prof Eric Chitambar, UIUC

September 22 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Building Multiple Access Channels with a Single Particle SPEAKER: Professor Eric Chitambar AFFILIATION: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA HOSTED BY: A/Prof Min-Hsiu Hsieh, Centre for Quantum Software and Information ABSTRACT:  A multiple access channel describes a situation in which multiple senders are trying to forward messages to a single receiver using some communication medium. In this talk we consider scenarios in which this medium consists of just a single classical or quantum particle. In the quantum case, the particle can be prepared in a…

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QSI UTS Online Seminar: Strategies for quantum optimisation algorithms with short run-times – Dr Viv Kendon, Durham University, UK

September 17 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

SPEAKER:Dr Viv Kendon, Durham University, Durham, UK TITLE: Strategies for quantum optimisation algorithms with short run-times. SPEAKER: Dr Viv Kendon AFFILIATION:  Durham University, Durham, UK HOSTED BY: A/Prof Nathan Langford, UTS Centre for Quantum Software and Information ABSTRACT: Continuous-time quantum computing includes computation by continuous-time quantum walk (QW), adiabatic quantum computing (AQC), quantum annealing (QA), and special purpose quantum simulators. All evolve the initial quantum state to the final quantum state using a continuous-time process.  This is a natural way to compute with quantum systems.…

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CQC2T Online Seminar: A strong no-go theorem on the Wigner’s friend paradox – Prof Howard Wiseman & Kok-Wei Bong

September 15 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Speakers: Prof. Howard Wiseman & Kok-Wei Bong, from Griffith University Research overview: A strong no-go theorem on the Wigner’s friend paradox Does quantum theory apply at all scales, including that of observers? New light on this fundamental question has recently been shed through a resurgence of interest in the long-standing Wigner’s friend paradox. This is a thought experiment addressing the quantum measurement problem—the difficulty of reconciling the (unitary, deterministic) evolution of isolated systems and the (non-unitary, probabilistic) state update after…

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QSI UTS Online Seminar: Coherent electrical control of a high spin nucleus in silicon – Dr Vincent Mourik, CQC2T

September 15 @ 8:00 am - 9:00 am

TITLE: Coherent electrical control of a high spin nucleus in silicon SPEAKER: Dr Vincent Mourik AFFILIATION: Fundamental Quantum Technologies Laboratory & Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, UNSW, Sydney HOSTED BY: Dr JP Dehollain, UTS Centre for Quantum Software and Information ABSTRACT: Nuclear electric resonance (NER) enables transitions of a high spin nucleus by modulating its electrical quadrupole interaction with an electric field. In this talk I will show how we found this effect in our single 123-Sb donor…

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QSI UTS Online Seminar: Quantum versus classical learnability of discrete distributions – Dominik Hangleiter

September 10 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

SPEAKER: Dominik Hangleiter, Freie Universität Berlin TITLE: Quantum versus classical learnability of discrete distributions ABSTRACT:  Quantum machine learning has been hailed as one of the promising near-term applications of small quantum computers and much research is focused on devising quantum heuristics that might yield an advantage over classical learning algorithms. In this talk, we will take a step back and ask: Can we hope for a provable quantum advantage in machine learning? To this end we focus on the following…

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QSI UTS Online Seminar: Q# and the Quantum Development Kit – Dr Sarah Kaiser

September 8 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am

SPEAKER: Dr Sarah Kaiser, WA, USA TITLE: Q# and the Quantum Development Kit: Research and program quantum algorithms in the way you think about them. ABSTRACT: As the field of quantum computing expands from the academic to the industry realm, we need a way that we can continue to collaborate and innovate in both regimes. Open source quantum software development platforms like the Quantum Development Kit and Q# from Microsoft, serve as a bridge to connect research ideas to reality. In…

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AIP-ARC Online Seminar: A shortcut to property prediction for photovoltaic material through machine learning – Exciton Science

September 4 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Exciton Science Webinar SPEAKER: Dr Nas Meftahi, RMIT University TITLE: A shortcut to property prediction for photovoltaic material through machine learning Join Dr Nas Meftahi from RMIT University and the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science. In this work, she will explore machine learning approaches that can leverage computationally expensive DFT calculations to estimate key photovoltaics material properties quickly and accurately. Register: https://bit.ly/2YBSpg6 Password: 686842

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QSI UTS Seminar: Quantum many-body physics of photons in waveguide QED – Dr Sahand Mahmoodian

September 3 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Speaker: Dr Sahand Mahmoodian (University of Hannover) Where: https://utsmeet.zoom.us/j/99727584893 TITLE: Quantum many-body physics of photons in waveguide QED ABSTRACT: The generation and control of strongly interacting photons is a long-standing goal of quantum optics. In recent years, remarkable experiments with cavity QED platforms, strongly interacting Rydberg atoms, and circuit QED have demonstrated photon-photon interactions at the few-body level. In this talk I show that a conceptually simple platform of two-level atoms ideally coupled to a chiral photonic mode forms an…

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Seminar: Additivity in Classical-Quantum Wiretap Channels – Arkin Tikku (USYD)

September 3 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

SPEAKER: Arkin Tikku, University of Sydney TITLE: Additivity in Classical-Quantum Wiretap Channels ABSTRACT: Due to Csiszar and Koerner, the private capacity of classical wiretap channels has a single-letter characterization in terms of the private information. For quantum wiretap channels, however, it is known that regularization of the private information is necessary to reach the capacity. Here, we study hybrid classical-quantum wiretap channels in order to resolve to what extent quantum effects are needed to witness non-additivity phenomena in quantum Shannon theory.…

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SQA Seminar: What can we do with near-term quantum computers? – Dr Isaac Kim

September 1 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Speaker: Dr Isaac Kim, University of Sydney Isaac Kim is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney. He works on quantum information theory and quantum computation and has worked at PsiQuantum, Stanford, IBM, Perimeter Institute prior to joining USYD. Abstract: In the near future, quantum computing researchers are expected to have access to quantum computers consisting of a few hundred qubits. Due to the absence of error correction, these near-term devices will not be reliable enough to carry out…

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CQC2T Online Seminar: Engineering long spin coherence times of spin–orbit qubits in silicon – Prof Sven Rogge

September 1 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Speaker: Prof. Sven Rogge, UNSW Sydney Research overview: Engineering long spin coherence times of spin–orbit qubits in silicon A group of international scientists, led by Prof Sven Rogge from UNSW Sydney, have substantially lengthened the duration of time that a spin-orbit qubit in silicon can retain quantum information for, opening up a new pathway to make silicon quantum computers more scalable and functional. Spin-orbit qubits have been investigated for over a decade as an option to scale up the number…

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